Identifying Statements, Commands, Questions, and Exclamations

Identifying Statements, Commands, Questions, and Exclamations

Purpose
To be able to distinguish between the various types of sentences.

Material
Four headings:

These are questions.   

These are exclamations

These restatements

These are commands

Twelve sentence labels (three for each of the above categories).

The printed alphabet, including question marks, exclamation marks, and periods.

Language Arts journals and pencils.

Presentation
Most Montessori teachers introduce this topic in Year 1 and review it as necessary in subsequent years.

Invite a small group of students to gather around a mat.

Announce to the students that today they will practice distinguishing between the various of sentences.

PART 1: REVIEWING THE TYPES OF SENTENCES AND SUITABLE END PUNCTUATION

Pass a heading to a student, and invite the, to read it aloud and place it at the top of the mat. Example: These are questions.

Encourage the students to discuss what type of punctuation mark should be used at the end of a question (question mark).

Pass different heading to a student, and invite them to read it aloud and place it at the top of the mat, next, to the first label. Example: These are exclamatory sentences.

Encourage the students to discuss what type punctuation mark should be used at the end of an exclamatory sentence (exclamation mark).

Repeat this with the other headings (for statements and commands, both of which end in a period.

PART 2: PUTTING IT INTO PRACTICE

Shuffle the 12 sentence labels together, and distribute them among the students.

Invite a student to read aloud the sentence on their label, and decide whether the sentence is a question, exclamation, statement, or command.

Invite the student to place the sentence beneath the correct category heading and place the appropriate punctuation at the end.

Repeat the previous steps until all the students have had their turn and all the labels have been placed on the mat.

Ask the students to write two samples of each sentence inter journals.

Extension
In a small group, write out a script for a short skit that employs most sentences ending in periods, question marks, or exclamations. Perform your skit in front of your teacher and classmates. Discuss the punctuation used in the skit.

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